I like reading books on ux and design in my free time.


The more I know, the more I can give back to the people who will interact with my work. It's also fun :)

Fully Annotated - Fav - Multiple Reads


Pls Recommend Me a Book



Present Reads.


Designing Products for the Digital Age

Designing Products for the Digital Age

Jun.2018 - Present

Recommended to me by my Deloitte UX mentor Brendan!

Buy It

Nudge

Nudge

July.2018 - Present

Recommended to me by my Deloitte reading buddy Ryan

Buy It




Past Reads.


Universal Principles of Design

Universal Principles of Design

July.2018

Recommended to me by my UX peer Zoey! What a fantastic book! The design, both visual and architectural, is spot on making what would be a boring encyclopedia into an effortless delight. I was already familiar with many of the concepts and theories in this book, but there were a plethora of engaging examples to make the review enjoyable. Do check out the piece on project pigeon, it's unforgettable.

Buy It

Hooked

Hooked

July.2018

This was delightful as it was light. Eyal explores and documents examples of his "hook" life cycle theory which has given me an extra layer to eyeball and contemplate products and apps I use in my daily life. One of the more interesting topics that caught my attention was "labor makes love" and the many ways users can invest their lives into products from building furniture to grooming a social media page. I might turn instagram off for a bit because I feel like a druggy after reading this.

Buy It

The Lean Startup

The Lean Startup

July.2018

Recommended to me by my Deloitte reading buddy Ryan! The Lean Startup is a must-read for anyone who takes up the mantle of "PM" at any point in their career. Eric does a great job of mixing real world examples, case studies, and management theory to make a compelling argument towards the acceptance of "validated learning" as a means of judging start-up success.

Validated learning, in many ways, intersects with some core fundamentals behind UX research e.g. experimentation and iteration. The key difference to me lies in the itensity of each iteration. Whereas validated learning encourages experimenting with customers, moving quickly, and reducing waste- the quintessential UX research process is much more thorough. From my experience working on designs for complicated work domains, single-batching or chunking out an experience in pieces risks increased friction in that experience's transitional phases. For example, if we were to focus to rapidly design, development, and release a transportation booking profile page before the payment page or vice versa, there will inevitably be a break in the experience for profile/payment transitions such as saved credit cards, addresses, etc. In other words, from a traditional UX perspective an experience cannot be evaluated as an experience unless the full system is designed and thought through as a whole rather than in parts.

To be fair, two things can be said. First, this book is clearly written for startups- they don't have a large customer base already established so experimentation is safer, speed is a key factor for survival, and work domains won't be as complex. Second, in the case this were to be applied to a complex domain, Eric is smart to document the use of the andon cord- popularized by Toyota, this acts as a speed-bump mechanism to ensure quality is not compromised. However, as nice as it would be to have an andon cord, most work environments will storm through problems to meet deadlines which will inevitably causes errors.

To me, there are two ways to solve this. First, we need better managers who understand the importance of investing into quality of experience and are willing to spend more time conducting UX-based research which matches Eric's enthusiasm for experimentation with customers and validated learning. Second, as designers we also need to know when to draw the line. Often the best design solution is the most satisfactory one, not the most perfect.

Buy It

The Atomic Chef

The Atomic Chef

Jun.2018

I bought this book since it was the spiritual successor of Set Phasers on Stun. In hindsight, the first book was more than enough and a second really wasn't necessary. The scenarios and explanations are more long-winded and did not pique my curiosity as much, but I think it's more of a result of having too much of the same. I'll try and pick this one up maybe again two or three years down the line.

Buy It

Understanding Comics

Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art

Jun.2018

Recommended to me by my UX work buddy Felicia! This comic is awesome. By awesome, I mean it explores new areas of thought I've never even imagined before. This took me only two days, mostly because it was a crazy enjoyable read. I'd recommend this to anyone who's ever been interested in art, writing, and the fabulous medium that blends them together- comics.

Buy It

Renegade Dreams

Renegade Dreams

Jun.2018

Recommended to me by the lovely and talented Molly! I picked up this book with hopes it would give me better insight into the ethnographic process- particularly with lower income based communities as I become more involved with state work at Deloitte Digital.

I did not, however, expect to become attached to the emotional dialogue shared between the many individuals in Eastwood. Laurence, the author, does a masterful job in objectively analyzing these interactions without peeling off the humanity. The biggest take away anyone can get from this book is within Laurence’s penultimate conclusion of the “Frame.” Though the world may see Eastwood through the narrow lens of a newscaster’s camera, there is still so much more to be understood and interpreted. From the symbol of the cane, to Jordan sneakers and faux poetry there is a resilience and hope that cannot be captured unless seen within its proper context.

Buy It

The Life-Changing Manga of Tidying Up

The Life-Changing Manga of Tidying Up

Jun.2018

Recommended to me by my close friend Ayoung! No, it's not really a UX design "book" in the scholarly sense- but it shares concepts of thought that translate well into our world. Most notably, Marie Kondo gives an even more positive spin to the oft quoted "Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away" by Antoine de Saint-Exupery (we all need to collectively stop quoting this, it literally appears in every UX book ever).

In her words, it's important to systematically identify and keep items that "spark joy" while discarding those that don't. From a UX perspective it's a compelling challenge to commit to reaching the peak of our work- minimalistic experiences that bring joy through phenomenological interaction (Dr. Hartson gives a good explanation of phenomenological aspects of interaction in "The UX Book" if you want to learn more about it).

Buy It

Set Phasers on Stun

Set Phasers on Stun

May.2018

Recommended to me by my UX peer Zoey! From the very first chapter I was sold; there's a dark, twisted curiosity that makes this book hard to put down. Casey never offers clear design answers on how these accidents could have been avoided, which kept me constantly brainstorming lists of possible solutions. I would recommend this book as a tongue in cheek follow up to the Design of Everyday Things.

Buy It

About Face is lit

About Face Ed. 4

Apr.2018 - May.2018

Alan Cooper has sold me on his goal-directed approach as a substitute to contextual inquiry. Using About Face as a reference, I was able to create personas that guided decision making on my project the Perfect Brew! That being said, the first part "Goal Directed Design" stood out the most to me in terms of utility. While Cooper's extended documentation on best practices for interaction design is helpful as a reference point, many of its contents will be a repeat of information for most UX practitioners.

Buy It

Pretty cool

How to Make Sense of Any Mess

May.2018

A light and easy read. Abby Covert's application of her own book's theory is perhaps where this publication shines most. Although I was familiar with most of the concepts documented, I learned volumes simply by taking notice of Abby's meticulous efforts to create a paragon IA example page by page. Also a banger for easy-to-pull quotes!

Buy It

The UX Book

The UX Book

Jul.2017 - Mar.2018 2

My holy grail of UX. This is probably the perfect starting book for any beginner and worth two reads if you have the time. Great as a UX reference point for any situation. The content is a little dense, so I recommend splitting this up into parts.

Buy It

The Design of Everyday Things

The Design of Everyday Things

Sep.2017 - Dec.2017 2

I think everyone in the UX field has read this book. If you haven't, you probably should. Norman is a pioneer in usability design, and this is a great starting point for anyone interested.

Buy It

The Design of Business

The Design of Business

Dec.2016

The book that started it all. This was given to me by my first UX mentor during my tenure as a UX Intern for Virginia Tech NIS. Great introduction to design thinking and an easy read.

Buy It



Future Reads.


Thiking, Fast and Slow

Thinking, Fast and Slow

Recommended to me by my Deloitte reading buddy Ryan.

Buy It